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Source: Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) “Is it worthwhile to try and match your genetics to the environment?” asked Dr. Jared Decker, Wurdack Chair of Animal Genomics, University of Missouri, to launch his presentation during the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) Symposium...
Source: Livestock Gentec In the ever-evolving landscape of agriculture, the future of cattle herds hinges on strategic planning and embracing cutting-edge technologies. Among these technologies, genomics stands out as a powerful tool that can revolutionize the way we manage and...
Source: BIF “Gene editing is the use of modern molecular technology to precisely change the DNA sequence of an organism. And the key words here are modern and precisely,” said Dr. Jon Beever from the University of Tennessee during his...
Source: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada The Canadian cattle industry is one of the country’s largest industries and a major economic driver. Canadian cattle and dairy producers hold themselves to the highest standards for quality and sustainability, which is why their...
Source: Beef Improvement Federation The Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) announces the major update of iGENDEC for constructing custom selection indexes. The model update now includes a Beef x Dairy production circumstance. Beef x Dairy or dairy beef crossbreds are a growing...
Source: Government of Alberta Genomics, the study of the genetic information in humans, plants, animals and microbes, helps scientists learn patterns and functions that can be used to improve environmental stewardship and health care treatment or create more robust crops...
Source: University of Arkansas Improvement of the next generation calf crop is dependent upon the breeding decisions you make. Herd sire selection should be a thought-provoking and profit-driven decision process. Males account for approximately 90% of the gene pool, contributing more...
Source: Beef Improvement Federation by Larry Kuehn and Mark Thallman Across-Breed EPD (ABEPD) Adjustment Factors: National Cattle Evaluation (NCE), and the resulting Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs), have resulted in substantial genetic change since their inception in the 1970s.  However, EPDs are...
Source: Pennsylvania State University Expected progeny differences (EPDs) have been applied to improve the genetics of beef cattle for almost four decades. Expected progeny differences are predictions of the genetic transmitting ability of a parent to its offspring and are...
Source: RDAR The Canadian Angus Association will receive $3.8M to increase Canadian cattle producers' ability to make data-driven decisions based on genomics to economically benefit their commercial livestock operations. The investment will be used to develop a genetic selection tool...
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